Wellbeing

 

20/09/16 - RADIO: Anatomy of Rest: The Quest for Rest (42 mins x 3) Rest sounds like a straightforward topic. We think we know what it is. Until you start to look closely and then it's not so simple. Over the last two years Claudia Hammond has been working at the Wellcome Collection in London as part of a team called Hubbub - a group including psychologists, artists, poets, neuroscientists, musicians, historians and sociologists - all coming together to examine the topic of rest. In the first of three programmes Claudia attempts to define rest. Is it the absence of work? Does it have to mean doing nothing? Claudia discusses the concept of rest with a historian, a composer, a poet and an English literature scholar.

2/09/16 - RADIO:  Oliver Burkeman Is Busy: The Busyness Paradox  (15 mins x 5) There's a ritual of the modern workplace - one you've heard and most likely indulged in yourself. It's the call and response we go through when you ask a workmate how they're doing: "Busy!" "So busy." "mentally busy." It is pretty obviously a boast disguised as a complaint. And our simultaneously grim and half chuckled reply comes as a kind of congratulation: "Ha, better than the opposite." When did we start doing that? As if he didn't have enough to do Oliver Burkeman explores this epidemic of busyness to reveal that it may not be what it at first seems.

27/05/15 - RADIO: Thinking Allowed: Happiness Industry; Wellness Syndrome (28 mins) The Happiness Industry: Laurie Taylor talks to Will Davies, Senior Lecturer in Politics at Goldsmiths, University of London, who asks why policy makers have become increasingly focused on measuring happiness. Also, 'wellness syndrome': Andre Spicer, Professor of Organisational Behaviour at City University, argues that visions of positive social change have been replaced by a focus on individual well-being. They're joined by Laura Hyman, Lecturer in Sociology at the University of Portsmouth.

01/10/14 - RADIO: The Educators (8 x 30mins) Sarah Montague interviews the people whose ideas are challenging the future of education.

06/07/14 - RADIO: Sir Michael Marmot on Desert Island Discs (30 mins) Professor of Epidemiology and Public Health and Director of the Institute of Health Equality at University College London, Sir Michael specialises in what are known as the social determinants of health: how where we are in the wealth and status pecking order directly influences our chances of illness, disease and lifespan. Why is it, for example, that in 2014 in the same British city the average life expectancy for a man in one post code will be 82 but just a few miles away it's 54? His work has influenced politicians around the globe.

05/03/13 - RADIO:  You & Yours on Parenting  (55 mins) Overly-intrusive and babying parents are leaving children unable to cope with later life, according to an advisor to David Cameron. An endless treadmill of organised activities means many never learn to fend for themselves and parents' desires to see their children excel mean many are avoiding the 'difficult stuff' and failing to set limits.

What does it mean to be human? 

Join celebrated anthropologist Wade Davis, the National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence, who has been described as “a rare combination of scientist, scholar, poet and passionate defender of all of life’s diversity”. He tracks indigenous cultures, each unique for the preservation of their customs in the face of modernization. As he investigates these people heading towards an uncertain future, Davis highlights a fundamental question: what does it mean to be human?

Over the past decade, many of us have been alarmed to learn of the rapidly accelerating extinction of our planet's diverse flora and fauna. But how many of us know that our human cultural diversity is also going extinct at a shocking rate? Biologists estimate that 18% of mammals and 11% of birds are threatened, while botanists anticipate a loss of 8% of flora. Meanwhile, of the 7,000 languages in the world today, fully 50% will dissapear in our lifetime.

"Cultural survival is not about preservation, sequestering indigenous peoples in enclaves like some sort of zoological specimens. Change itself does note destroy a culture. All societies are constantly evolving. Indeed a culture survives when it has enough confidence in its past and enough say in its future to maintain its spirit and essence through all the changes it will inevitably undergo. "

VIDEO: The Wayfinders of Polynesia

VIDEO: The Wayfinders: Why Ancient Wisdom Matters in the Modern World

Index on Wade Davis films on Vimeo

The worldwide web of belief and ritual

Anthropologist Wade Davis muses on the worldwide web of belief and ritual that makes us human. He shares breathtaking photos and stories of the Elder Brothers, a group of Sierra Nevada indians whose spiritual practice holds the world in balance.